Orv Brettman’s answer to Question number 50 of the NorWest Township questionnaire (primary 2018)

In the world of politics, what is your definition of a). conservative, b). moderate, and c). liberal?

I am a paleoconservative. paleoconservatives press for restrictions on immigration, a rollback of multicultural programs, the decentralization of the federal policy, the restoration of controls upon free trade, a greater emphasis upon economic nationalism and non-interventionism in the conduct of American foreign policy, and a generally revanchist outlook upon a social order in need of recovering old lines of distinction and in particular the assignment of roles in accordance with traditional categories of gender, ethnicity, and race.

A moderate can be defined as: a general term for people who fall in the center category of the left-right political spectrum. In recent years, the term political moderates has gained traction as a buzzword. The existence of the ideal moderate is disputed because of a lack of a moderate political ideology. Voters who describe themselves as centrist often mean that they are moderate in their political views, advocating neither extreme left-wing politics nor right-wing politics. Gallup polling has shown American voters identifying themselves as moderate between 35–38% of the time over the last 20 years.[2] Voters may identify with moderation for a number of reasons: pragmatic, ideological or otherwise. It has even been suggested that individuals vote for ‘centrist’ parties for purely statistical reasons.

A liberal is defined as:

Classical liberalism, a political or social philosophy advocating the freedom of the individual, parliamentary systems of government, nonviolent modification of political, social, or economic institutions to assure unrestricted development in all spheres of human endeavor, and governmental guarantees of individual rights and civil liberties

Conservative liberalism, a variant of liberalism, combining liberal values and policies with conservative stances, or, more simply, representing the right-wing of the liberal movement

Economic liberalism, the ideological belief in organizing the economy on individualist lines, such that the greatest possible number of economic decisions are made by private individuals and not by collective institutions

Social liberalism, the belief that liberalism should include social justice and that the legitimate role of the state includes addressing issues such as unemployment, healthcare, education, and the expansion of civil rights.

Most of the persons who now refer to themselves as liberal in the United States are in fact actually Progressives which is a whole different animal to wit:

In America, progressivism began as a social movement in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and grew into a political movement, in what was known as the Progressive Era. While the term “American progressives” represent a range of diverse political pressure groups (not always united), some American progressives rejected Social Darwinism, believing that the problems society faced (poverty, violence, greed, racism, class warfare) could best be addressed by providing good education, a safe environment, and an efficient workplace. Progressives lived mainly in the cities, were college educated, and believed that government could be a tool for change. American President Theodore Roosevelt of the U.S. Republican Party and later the U.S. Progressive Party, declared that he “always believed that wise progressivism and wise conservatism go hand in hand”. American President Woodrow Wilson was also a member of the American progressive movement, within the Democratic Party.

Progressive stances have evolved over time. In the late 19th century, for example, certain progressives argued for scientific racism on the grounds that it had a scientific basis. Other progressives holding both Christian and racist beliefs justified racism on biblical text. Modern progressives now tend to describe race as merely a social construct, noting that genetic markers are not exclusive to any race of people, and that human races do not even exist biologically. Imperialism was a controversial issue within progressivism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, particularly in the United States where some progressives supported American imperialism, while others opposed it.